Lighthouse Academy Canada | Online High School | OSSD Credit Courses

LHA Course Calendar

1.1   Goals and philosophy 1.2   School Organization 1.3   LHA’s code of conduct
2.1   Compulsory credit requirements 2.2   Optional credit requirements 2.3   Ontario secondary school literacy requirement 2.4   Community involvement 2.5   Substitution policy for compulsory credit requirement 2.6   Requirements for Ontario Secondary School Certificate (OSSC) 2.7   Certificate of Accomplishment
3.1   Definition of a credit 3.2   Types of course 3.3   Course coding system 3.4   Descriptions of the courses 3.5   Access to outlines of the course of studies 3.6   Access to Ontario Curriculum policy documents 3.7   Experimental Learning Programs 3.8   Withdrawal policy for grade 11-12 courses 3.9   Changing Course Types 3.10 Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR) 3.11 Other ways of earning Credits 3.12 Evaluation and Examination Policies 3.13 Reporting Student Achievement
4.1    Guidance for future plan 4.2   Resources for students and parents 4.3   Supports for English language learners 4.4   Computer labs and resource center/library 4.5   Community resources
The Goals of Educational Services are to: Provide every student with the opportunity for personal and academic learning. This includes rigorous and challenging curricula, equal access to high quality instruction, and innovative interventions and support to ensure student success. We believe that the Lighthouse Academy (LHA) Canada will serve all the people as best as it can. In order to do this, the school system believes that individuals should be accepted at their level of development and guided in such a way that they learn what is expected of them. We expect students to mature to their individual capacity emotionally, intellectually, physically, socially, and vocationally. The student’s educational development toward the school’s goals is the central concern of the LHA’s Board’s policies and the administrative regulations. The teacher is a key figure in carrying out the school’s responsibility in the educational process. However, the teacher alone cannot effectively achieve all the objectives of education. The purpose of the various administrative departments is to provide conditions in the schools which permit teachers to work with maximum effectiveness and to provide them with a variety of tools and specialized assistance in developing and carrying out a program which will meet the needs of our students. The Board will seek to provide the facilities, personnel, equipment, and materials necessary for the education of all students for whom it is responsible. We believe that children are endowed with individual capacities and characteristics, and that our schools, to the best of their abilities, should provide students with the kind of education best fitted for them as individuals. We know that the needs of children are similar, but not identical, and we try to adapt our program to this knowledge. As children become older and more mature, we try to provide them with the opportunities to make choices, as we believe that the making of wise choices is a necessary part of living in a democracy. We believe, therefore, that those involved in education must make every effort to meet the needs of all students in granting them the fullest possible educational opportunities. Lighthouse Academy Canada planned to provide quality education to international students besides its local students seeking Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) credit courses online. Due to the commitment of Ontario government, Ontario is recognized as a leader of educational excellence across Canada and around the world and has become a prime education destination for international students in Canada. International students, who successfully completed the OSSD requirements, may consider Ontario as potential destination for their post-secondary education. LHA will ensure high quality learning experience for national and international students focusing on the specific educational needs of international students and consider every student equally and thus provide opportunities for the student to achieve success according to his or her own interests, abilities and goals. The philosophy of Lighthouse Academy Canada is to provide a student-centered education in the online environment. Teachers at the LHA will make sure that the students actively inquire into and make connections between ideas and subject areas. A variety of teaching methods will be used.  Curriculum at LHA will deal with real-life applications of student learning as much as possible. The curriculum expectations are stated as main objectives that are transparent to the students and have been broken down into achievable targets in each lesson and assessment. LHA will make sure that each student will be treated as an individual and encouraged to express their own opinions and ideas. A wide range of assessment and evaluation methods will be deployed at LHA including assignments, quizzes, tests, projects and final assessments etc. Our school philosophy includes a commitment to reach every student to help him or her to achieve a successful outcome from their school experience at LHA Canada. The concept of completing a secondary education is essential. Obtaining a high school diploma has become an increasingly important prerequisite for economic and social mobility in the world. Young people with a high school education are much better equipped for the modern life. They are more likely to be permanently employed and/or to be admitted to post-secondary institutions to further their education and become active members of our society. In Ontario, students are required to remain in secondary school until the student has reached the age of eighteen or obtained an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD). We develop strategies to help every single student and make sure that they learn. It will take a great deal of commitment, skill and collective energy to achieve the ambitious way of dealing the needs and requirement of the students. Reaching this target would put Ontario’s graduation in its optimum level. Students who leave school upon reaching the age of 18 without having met the requirements for the OSSD or OSSC may be granted a Certificate of Accomplishment. This certificate is a useful means of recognizing achievement for students who plan to continue certain kinds of training or find employment. A student may return to school and take additional credit and non-credit courses and have their transcript (OST) updated. A new certificate will not be awarded, but an OSSD or OSSC will be granted when the returning student has fulfilled the requirements. (OS, section 6.4). The OSSD requires that a student must earn 30 credits; 18 compulsory and 12 optional. A credit is defined as a 110-hour course in which the expectations are laid down by the Ontario Ministry of Education curriculum guideline. Students must also complete 40 hours of Community Involvement Activities and must meet the provincial literacy requirement. All students must successfully complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) in order to earn a secondary school diploma. This test is written in the Grade 10 year and is based on the Ontario curriculum expectations for language and communication, particular reading and writing, up to and including Grade 9. Successful completion of the test is recorded on the Ontario Student Transcript.
In the LHA, there will be different standard terminologies will be used to organize reporting periods and timetable organization. These are Allocated time usually defined as the time that the state, district, school, or teacher provides the student for instruction. Engaged time, usually defined as the time that students appear to be paying attention to materials or presentations that have instructional goals. A block schedule is a system for scheduling the middle- or high-school day, typically by replacing a more traditional schedule of six or seven 40–50-minute daily periods with longer class periods that meet fewer times each day and week. For example, a typical block-schedule class might last for 90 – 120 minutes and meet every other day instead of daily. While this changes from year to year, the best estimate currently given is that about 72% of high schools use some form of block scheduling. This may range from the entire school on block to one grade or one subject. Given below is a list of duties that students should perform at LHA:
  • Obey the teachers.
  • Maintain discipline in the class.
  • Greet everyone with smile.
  • Be helpful.
  • Abide by the rules of the school.
  • Complete the assigned work on time.
  • Participate in the activities organized in the school
  • Maintain academy honesty
  • Work to the best of ability
  • Being active participants in the learning and assessment process with teachers.
The Assessment and Evaluation Policy of Lighthouse Academy (LHA) Canada is consistent with the policy of Ontario Ministry of Education. LHA Assessment and Evaluation policy reflects its vision that the primary purpose of assessment is to improve student learning experience. With the LHA policy, it will be easier to gather information that accurately reflects how well a student is achieving the curriculum expectations in a subject or course. Assessment for the purpose of improving student learning is seen as “assessment as learning” and “assessment for learning”. As part of assessment as Learning, there is evidence of peer and self-assessment through such tools as checklists, peer reviews to provide descriptive feedback in discussion areas, and electronic portfolios used to gather self-assessments. As part of assessment for learning, teachers provide students with detail feedback and mentoring for improvement. Here are a few ways educators at LHA will help prevent or reduce absences, while making school a place that students want to be:
  • Communicate attendance expectations.
  • Form an attendance team.
  • Intervene early.
  • Track the positivity ratio.
  • Create a more positive school culture.
  • Make it easy to track and act on real-time data
Attendance is a key component of study process for the student success. Students who do not attend or login regularly for reviewing online course outline of the courses will not be successful in their process of learning. In Lighthouse Academy Canada, the teachers will monitor the attendance/login on the online platform which includes number of logins, hours spent on online and offline activities, student learning logs etc. Also student presence will be tracked by course software, course discussion forum and live video/chat session. The purpose of education at LHA is to produce ideal persons to face the responsibilities of the future. A student should be a person, who devotes himself to the pursuits of knowledge and learning. It is therefore, the first and foremost duty of an ideal student to seek knowledge.
The Lighthouse Academy (LHA) focused on five traits that not only set students apart from what they expect, but also exemplify what they set in themselves as they conduct their daily work of educating others. These five life skills serve students well and are an integral part of the education imparted by LHA. This kind of skill our students endure long after they finish their work with us.
  • Responsibility: Responsibility means understanding one’s roles and duties and being accountable for what is required in order to achieve one’s goals.
  • Respect: Respect means treating others positively by demonstrating an awareness of their unique qualities as well as their roles, duties, and goals.
  • Integrity: Integrity means consistently acting in an honest, trustworthy, and respectful way.
  • Perseverance: Perseverance means setting attainable, relevant, and worthwhile goals and remaining dedicated to achieving them.
  • Innovation: Innovation means creatively approaching tasks and challenges by developing new methods, ideas, or products.
Attendance Regular attendance is the key to student success. Students who log in and/or are not actively involved in the course threaten their opportunities to learn and reach their full potential. Teachers will monitor student attendance patterns and will work with them and their parents/guardians to support students in any way possible. If the student attendance issue is not resolved, the authorities will be informed that the possible consequences may include student contact with parent/guardian, attendance contract, or removal from the program. Students who have not completed the course within 12 months will be removed from the course and will not resume course unless there is a mitigating condition that can be verified. Plagiarism Plagiarism is an act of theft known by many names: deception, borrowing, theft or copying. Plagiarism intentionally or unintentionally uses the words or ideas of another person and presents them as their own. It involves presenting an essay written by another student, allowing a student to present your work, receiving one of the many services provided online or copying sections from various documents and not recognizing the original source. This is a serious offence that can have significant academic consequences Students should understand that the tests/exams they complete and the assignments they submit for evaluation should be their own work, and that cheating, and plagiarism will not be condoned. In Lighthouse Academy, there are strategies that help students understand the seriousness of this behavior and the importance of recognizing the work of others. We are working on the prevention of deception and plagiarism, the detection of cases of deception and plagiarism and consequences for students who cheat or plagiarism. Lighthouse Academy requires academic honesty from all students. It requires that students always submit original work and pay tribute to all sources of research correctly and consistently. Computer use policy The Learning Management System (LMS) at the Lighthouse Academy is only for educational purposes. Any use of LMS tools within the course for any purpose other than intended educational purposes is prohibited. Misuse includes, but is not limited to, criminal, obscene, commercial or illegal purposes. The administration reserves the right to review all student work to determine whether the computer should be used. If it is deemed that LMS is being misused, the administration will take consequences that may include suspension and/or exclusion from the program. In some cases, additional measures may be taken, including access to day schools, legal representation or the police. Students should remain vigilant to prevent them from entering a situation where they may be suspected of misuse. Therefore, students are reminded to:
  • Protect your passwords and keep them secret.
  • Notify your teacher as soon as you receive suspicious messages or any incidents involving an LHA account or personal email used to interact with LHA.
  • Only access content intended for student use.
Assignments Each online course is available and accessed online. Wherever they are – at home, in a library or in an Internet cafe – students can access their courses from any computer with Internet access. Every course has required assignments, which are located on the exclusive website. On the same website, there is also a discussion board where students can communicate with their teachers and classmates. Each full credit course is 110 hours and the program can take up to 5 months to complete. Students can set their own pace and study schedules to meet individual schedules and needs. Students interested in extending the course period may do so; Lighthouse Academy faculties manage their online courses in a manner like traditional classroom courses and will answer any student’s questions within 1 business day. The assessment assignment will be returned to the student within 5-7 business days. Students must meet the Education Department’s expectations for the course and complete 110 hours of planned learning activities to receive course credit. Students must also keep a learning journal throughout the course that outlines the activities they have completed and the total learning time. The learning journal creates an official record of student attendance and assignment submission in each course. Submission of Assignments Lighthouse Academy’s courses are designed to meet the needs of students, require flexible learning schedules and have unique needs in everyday life. Students can choose the time of day, as well as which day of the week or weekend they will work on their course. The main goal of Lighthouse Academy is for students to meet the curriculum requirements of the Ontario Department of Education. With this goal, the concept of missed or late tasks does not exist. Students should log in to their courses and submit assignments on a regular basis; Students can set their own schedule for regular submissions and extend the duration of the course at any time they deem necessary (additional tuition will be charged). All Lighthouse Academy courses must be completed within one year. This limitation preserves the integrity of the academic assessment and evaluation policy provided by the Ontario Department of Education. As an online high school, Lighthouse Academy does not accept coursework via Canada Post, Courier or other forms of “snail” mail. We encourage and advise students to complete all assignments electronically. In math and science courses, it is sometimes difficult for students to use word-processing to express their ideas. If students feel they need to submit a handwritten assignment, they should scan the assignment and email it directly to the applicable teacher or upload it to the school portal. The Lighthouse Academy does not recommend submitting works by fax, as the quality of the fax is often low and difficult for teachers to read. Teacher Assistance and Marks Although Lighthouse Academy strives to provide students with everything they need, many times students ask questions to their teachers. The instructor will respond to course questions within 1 day of receiving the email. It is important for students to receive feedback from their teachers as they continue their studies. Therefore, student assignments should be sent by e-mail as soon as they are completed. Students should not send teachers to work in large units at once; Exams, large assignments, and stand-alone study units can take up to 7 business days to mark and return. Chat with Teachers Teachers have office hours every week; this is an opportunity to discuss the course and ask questions about exams and assignments. The bulletin area for each course posts the teacher’s online office hours and other information.
To achieve Ontario Secondary School Diploma, a student must:
  • Earn 30 credits (18 compulsories and 12 optional credits)
  • Complete 40 hours of community involvement activities
  • Complete the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test Successfully
Students must earn the following compulsory credits to obtain the Ontario Secondary School Diploma:
  • 4 credits in English (1 credit per grade) *
  • 3 credits in mathematics (1 credit in Grade 11 or 12)
  • 2 credits in science
  • 1 credit in Canadian history
  • 1 credit in Canadian geography
  • 1 credit in the arts
  • 1 credit in health and physical education
  • 1 credit in French as a second language
  • 0.5 credit in career studies
  • 0.5 credit in civics
Plus, one credit from each of the following groups:
  • 1 additional credit (group 1): additional credit in English, or French as a second language, ** or a Native language, or a classical or an international language, or social sciences and the humanities, or Canadian and world studies, or guidance and career education, or cooperative education***
  • 1 additional credit (group 2): additional credit in health and physical education, or the arts, or business studies, or French as a second language, ** or cooperative education***
  • 1 additional credit (group 3): additional credit in science (Grade 11 or 12), or technological education, or French as a second language, ** or computer studies, or cooperative education***
*A maximum of 3 credits in English as a second language (ESL) or English literacy development (ELD) may be counted towards the 4 compulsory credits in English, but the fourth must be a credit earned for a Grade 12 compulsory English course. **In groups 1, 2, and 3, a maximum of 2 credits in French as a second language can count as compulsory credits, one from group 1 and one from either group 2 or group 3. ***A maximum of 2 credits in cooperative education can count as compulsory credits. The 12 optional credits may include up to 4 credits earned through approved dual credit courses.
In addition to the 18 compulsory credits, students must earn 12 optional credits.
All students must successfully complete the literacy requirements of provincial secondary schools in order to obtain a secondary school diploma. It will be based on the Ontario curriculum’s expectations for language and communication, especially reading and writing. This helps to determine whether students have acquired reading and writing skills that are considered essential to literacy, and whether those who successfully completed this requirement have met provincial literacy expectations Students who pass this course are eligible for literacy graduation. This course differs from other courses in that it outlines the specific requirements for the assessment to ensure compliance with OSSLT requirements. Credits earned in successful completion of OSSLC can be used to meet mandatory credit requirements for Level 11 or 12 in English. If you are using Grade 11 compliant, the course code is OLC3O. If you are using Grade 12 compliant, the course code is OLC4O. This credit can also be used to meet the mandatory credit requirements for the First Set of Ontario Secondary Diplomas. Students should check the admission requirements for post-secondary institutions, as OSSLC may not be accepted as a 12th-grade English admission requirement for a college or university course. OSSLC can be used as an alternative to meet mandatory integral requirements. Accommodations Students who are officially recognized as having an Individual Education Program (IEP) are entitled to accommodation. These accommodations must be consistent with the accommodation available to students who have completed their regular schoolwork, including examinations and other forms of assessment. Special Provisions Special requirements for English learners (ELLs), such as extra time, regular supervised breaks, and personal or group settings. After consulting with the student and parent/guardian or adult student, the principal will decide which special terms should be provided to support the student. Deferrals The principal will decide whether to grant the extension after consulting with the student and the parent/guardian or adult student. The students are expected to write OSSLT during the next government. Deferrals are intended for: ELL students who have not yet acquired a level of proficiency in English to successfully complete the OSSLT; • Students who have been identified as exceptional and would not be able to participate even if all accommodations were provided; Students who have not yet acquired the reading and writing skills appropriate for Grade 9; and Students who are unable to write due to illness, injury or other extenuating circumstances. Exemptions Students must have an IEP that clearly states that they have not obtained a high school diploma in order to be exempt from writing OSSLT. The Principal, in consultation with the parent/guardian and the student, will make all decisions on the exemption.
As part of the diploma requirement, students must complete at least 40 hours of community engagement. These activities can be completed at any time during the secondary school curriculum. Students work with parents to decide how to meet community engagement requirements. Students can start before the 9th grade in the summer. Community engagement can take place in a variety of settings, including businesses, non-profit organizations, public sector institutions (including hospitals) and informal settings. Students may not do so by crediting activities (e.g., cooperative education and work experience), paid work, or assuming responsibilities normally performed by salaried employees. Requirements are done outside of the student’s normal teaching hours, i.e. activities are performed at the student’s designated lunch hour, after school, weekend son or school holidays. Students will maintain and provide records of their community involvement. The required 40 hours of completion must be confirmed by the organization or person overseeing the activity. Documentation certifying the completion of each activity must be submitted to the principal by the student. For each activity, the document must include the name of the person or organization receiving the service, the activity performed, the date and time, the signature of the student and his/her parents, and the signature confirmation of the person (or organization representative). Some volunteer activities may require consultation with the principal.

Lighthouse Academy Canada ensures flexibility in designing student’s program so that all the students can qualify for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or Ontario Secondary School Certificate (OSSC). In order to do so, Lighthouse Academy will allow the students to substitute limited number of compulsory credits. Based on the situation of the individual student, the Principal may substitute up to three compulsory credits with courses from other subject areas specified in the list of compulsory credit requirements. Upon receipt the request from the parent, the Principal will determine if the substitution best serves the need of the student and the course of action. Each substitution will be noted on the student’s Ontario Transcript (OST).

Lighthouse Academy Canada will grant Ontario Secondary School Certificate (OSSC) to the students who leave the school before earning Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) based on the request from the students. In order to request for the Ontario Secondary School Certificate (OSSC), the students must earn a minimum of 14 credits including 7 compulsory credits as per following:

Compulsory Credits (total of 7)
  • 2 credits in English
  • 1 credit in Science
  • 1 credit in Mathematics
  • 1 credit in Health and Physical Education
  • 1 credit in Canadian Geography OR Canadian History
  • 1 credit in the Arts, Computer Studies OR Technological Education
Optional Credits (total of 7)
  • 7 credits selected by the student from available courses
Lighthouse Academy Canada will grant the Certificate of Accomplishment to the students who leave the school before fulfilling the requirements for Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) or Ontario Secondary School Certificate (OSSC). The students who plan to find employment after leaving the school or to take certain vocational programs or any other kind of further training, this Certificate of Accomplishment, provided by Lighthouse Academy might be an effective means of recognizing achievement for them.
A credit is granted to the students who successfully complete a course that is developed as per the Ontario Ministry of Education guidelines. To earn a credit, the students must need to schedule 110 hours of instructional time with the school. The Principal of Lighthouse Academy Canada will grant the credit to the students on behalf of the Ontario Ministry of Education.
Course curriculum for the Ontario secondary school program is designed in such a way so that students get the necessary knowledge base and skill that will be useful in their field of interest. This curriculum enables the students to choose courses within their interests, strengths and goals. Below is a brief description of courses offered for grade 9-12: Courses for Grades 9 & 10:
  • Academic Courses:
Academic courses develop students’ knowledge and skills through the study of theory and abstract problems. These courses focus on the essential concepts of a subject and explore related concepts as well. They incorporate practical applications as appropriate. The code of an academic course ends with the letter ‘D’, e.g. SNC1D
  • Applied Courses:
Applied courses focus on the essential concepts of a subject, and develop students’ knowledge and skills through practical applications and concrete examples. Familiar situations are used to illustrate ideas, and students are given more opportunities to experience hands-on applications of the concepts and theories they study. The code of an applied course ends with the letter ‘P’, e.g. MFM2P
  • Open Courses:
Open courses are designed to broaden students’ knowledge and skills in subjects that reflect their interests and to prepare them for active and rewarding participation in society. They are not designed with the specific requirements of universities, colleges, or the workplace in mind. The code of an open course ends with the letter ‘O’, e.g. FSF1O
  • Locally Developed Courses:
Locally Developed courses focus on the most essential concepts of a discipline. These courses are offered in Mathematics, Science, English and Canadian History. These courses will provide support for students making the transition to high school by enhancing their skills to allow them to be successful at secondary school. The code of a locally developed course ends with the letter ‘L’, e.g. LHC3L Courses for Grades 11 & 12:
  • College preparation Courses:
College preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for most college programs or for admission to specific apprenticeship or other training programs. The code of a college preparation course ends with the letter ‘C’, e.g. MCT4C
  • University Preparation Courses:
University preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for university programs. The code of a university preparation course ends with the letter ‘U’, e.g. ICS3U
  • University / College Preparation Courses:
University / college preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for specific programs offered at universities and colleges. The code of an university / college preparation course ends with the letter ‘M’, e.g. MCF3M
  • Open Courses:
Open courses, which comprise a set of expectations that are appropriate for all students, are designed to broaden students’ knowledge and skills in subjects that reflect their interests and prepare them for active and rewarding participation in society. They are not designed with the specific requirements of university, college, or the workplace in mind. The code of an open course ends with the letter ‘O’, e.g. EMS3O
  • Workplace Preparation Courses:
Workplace preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the expectations of employers, if they plan to enter the workforce directly after graduation, or the requirements for admission to certain apprenticeship or other training programs. The code of a Workplace preparation courses ends with the letter ‘E’, i.e. CIC4E
Course Code of all the courses of Lighthouse Academy consists of five code character as designated by the Ministry of Education and Training in Ontario (www.edu.gov.on.ca). First three characters of the course code refer to the name of the course. The fourth character refers to the grade of the course. The fifth character refers to the type of course.
Below is a list of all courses (credit courses and non-credit courses) for grade 9-12 offered by Lighthouse Academy Canada is given. GRADE 9 CREDIT COURSES: Course Code: MPM1D                 Course Title: Principles of Mathematics       Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: None                           Type: Academic This course enables students to develop an understanding of mathematical concepts related to algebra, analytic geometry, and measurement and geometry through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will investigate relationships, which they will then generalize as equations of lines, and will determine the connections between different representations of a linear relation. They will also explore relationships that emerge from the measurement of three-dimensional figures and two-dimensional shapes. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. Course Code: SNC1D                         Course Title: Science                                               Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: None                                 Type: Academic This course enables students to develop their understanding of basic concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and to relate science to technology, society, and the environment. Throughout the course, students will develop their skills in the processes of scientific investigation. Students will acquire an understanding of scientific theories and conduct investigations related to sustainable ecosystems; atomic and molecular structures and the properties of elements and compounds; the study of the universe and its properties and components; and the principles of electricity Course Code: SNC1P                        Course Title: Science                                     Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: None                                Type: Applied This course enables students to develop their understanding of basic concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and to apply their knowledge of science to everyday situations. They are also given opportunities to develop practical skills related to scientific investigation. Students will plan and conduct investigations into practical problems and issues related to the impact of human activity on ecosystems; the structure and properties of elements and compounds; space exploration and the components of the universe; and static and current electricity. GRADE 10 CREDIT COURSES: Course Code: ICS2O           Course Title:  Introduction to Computer Studies         Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: None                  Type: Open This course introduces students to computer programming. Students will plan and write simple computer programs by applying fundamental programming concepts, and learn to create clear and maintainable internal documentation. They will also learn to manage a computer by studying hardware configurations, software selection, operating system functions, networking, and safe computing practices. Students will also investigate the social impact of computer technologies, and develop an understanding of environmental and ethical issues related to the use of computers. Course Code: MPM2D            Course Title: Principles of Mathematics                  Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: Grade 9 Mathematics, Academic                                                               Type: Academic This course enables students to broaden their understanding of relationships and extend their problem-solving and algebraic skills through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will explore quadratic relations and their applications; solve and apply linear systems; verify properties of geometric figures using analytic geometry; and investigate the trigonometry of right and acute triangles. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. Course Code: SNC2D             Course Title: Science (Academic)                             Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: Grade 9 Science, Academic or Applied                                                   Type: Academic This course enables students to enhance their understanding of concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and of the interrelationships between science, technology, society, and the environment. Students are also given opportunities to further develop their scientific investigation skills. Students will plan and conduct investigations and develop their understanding of scientific theories related to the connections between cells and systems in animals and plants; chemical reactions, with a particular focus on acid–base reactions; forces that affect climate and climate change; and the interaction of light and matter. Course Code: SNC2P             Course Title: Science (Applied)                                Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: Grade 9 Science, Academic or Applied                                                  Type: Applied This course enables students to develop a deeper understanding of concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and to apply their knowledge of science in real-world situations. Students are given opportunities to develop further practical skills in scientific investigation. Students will plan and conduct investigations into everyday problems and issues related to human cells and body systems; chemical reactions; factors affecting climate change; and the interaction of light and matter. GRADE 11 CREDIT COURSES: Course Code: ICS3U              Course Title: Introduction to Computer Science       Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: None                     Type: University This course introduces students to computer science. Students will design software independently and as part of a team, using industry-standard programming tools and applying the software development life-cycle model. They will also write and use subprograms within computer programs. Students will develop creative solutions for various types of problems as their understanding of the computing environment grows. They will also explore environmental and ergonomic issues, emerging research in computer science, and global career trends in computer-related fields. Course Code: MCR3U                          Course Title: Functions                              Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: Principles of Mathematics, Grade 10, Academic                                Type: University This course introduces the mathematical concept of the function by extending students’ experiences with linear and quadratic relations. Students will investigate properties of discrete and continuous functions, including trigonometric and exponential functions; represent functions numerically, algebraically, and graphically; solve problems involving applications of functions; investigate inverse functions; and develop facility in determining equivalent algebraic expressions. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. Course Code: SBI3U                            Course Title: Biology                                  Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: Science, Grade 10, Academic                                                                 Type: University This course furthers students’ understanding of the processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biodiversity; evolution; genetic processes; the structure and function of animals; and the anatomy, growth, and function of plants. The course focuses on the theoretical aspects of the topics under study, and helps students refine skills related to scientific investigation. Course Code: SCH3U                          Course Title: Chemistry                               Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: Science, Grade 10, Academic                                                                  Type: University This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of the properties of chemicals and chemical bonds; chemical reactions and quantitative relationships in those reactions; solutions and solubility; and atmospheric chemistry and the behaviour of gases. Students will further develop their analytical skills and investigate the qualitative and quantitative properties of matter, as well as the impact of some common chemical reactions on society and the environment. GRADE 12 CREDIT COURSES: Course Code: ICS4U                       Course Title: Computer Science                             Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: Introduction to Computer Science, Grade 11, University Preparation   Type: University This course enables students to further develop knowledge and skills in computer science. Students will use modular design principles to create complex and fully documented programs, according to industry standards. Student teams will manage a large software development project, from planning through to project review. Students will also analyze algorithms for effectiveness. They will investigate ethical issues in computing and further explore environmental issues, emerging technologies, areas of research in computer science, and careers in the field. Course Code: MCV4U                      Course Title: Calculus and Vectors                       Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: The new Advanced Functions course (MHF4U) must be taken prior to or concurrently with Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U). Type: University This course builds on students’ previous experience with functions and their developing understanding of rates of change. Students will solve problems involving geometric and algebraic representations of vectors and representations of lines and planes in three dimensional spaces; broaden their understanding of rates of change to include the derivatives of polynomial, sinusoidal, exponential, rational, and radical functions; and apply these concepts and skills to the modelling of real-world relationships. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended for students who choose to pursue careers in fields such as science, engineering, economics, and some areas of business, including those students who will be required to take a university-level calculus, linear algebra, or physics course. Course Code: MDM4U          Course Title: Mathematics of Data Management     Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: Functions, Grade 11, University Preparation, or Functions and Applications, Grade 11, University/College Preparation Type: University This course broadens students’ understanding of mathematics as it relates to managing data. Students will apply methods for organizing and analyzing large amounts of information; solve problems involving probability and statistics; and carry out a culminating investigation that integrates statistical concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. Students planning to enter university programs in business, the social sciences, and the humanities will find this course of particular interest. Course Code: MHF4U                        Course Title: Advanced Functions                       Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: Functions, Grade 11, University Preparation, or Mathematics for College Technology, Grade 12, College Preparation Type: University This course extends students’ experience with functions. Students will investigate the properties of polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; develop techniques for combining functions; broaden their understanding of rates of change; and develop facility in applying these concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended both for students taking the Calculus and Vectors course as a prerequisite for a university program and for those wishing to consolidate their understanding of mathematics before proceeding to any one of a variety of university programs. Course Code: SBI4U                             Course Title: Biology                                 Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: Biology, Grade 11, University Preparation                                          Type: University This course provides students with the opportunity for in-depth study of the concepts and processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biochemistry, metabolic processes, molecular genetics, homeostasis, and population dynamics. Emphasis will be placed on the achievement of detailed knowledge and the refinement of skills needed for further study in various branches of the life sciences and related fields. Course Code: SCH4U                            Course Title: Chemistry                             Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: Chemistry, Grade 11, University Preparation                                      Type: University This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of organic chemistry, the structure and properties of matter, energy changes and rates of reaction, equilibrium in chemical systems, and electrochemistry. Students will further develop their problem-solving and investigation skills as they investigate chemical processes, and will refine their ability to communicate scientific information. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of chemistry in everyday life and on evaluating the impact of chemical technology on the environment. GRADE 9 NON-CREDIT COURSES: Course Code: MPM1D                     Course Title: Principles of Mathematics         Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: None                               Type: Academic This course enables students to develop an understanding of mathematical concepts related to algebra, analytic geometry, and measurement and geometry through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will investigate relationships, which they will then generalize as equations of lines, and will determine the connections between different representations of a linear relation. They will also explore relationships that emerge from the measurement of three-dimensional figures and two-dimensional shapes. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. Course Code: SNC1D                         Course Title: Science                                    Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: None                                 Type: Academic This course enables students to develop their understanding of basic concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and to relate science to technology, society, and the environment. Throughout the course, students will develop their skills in the processes of scientific investigation. Students will acquire an understanding of scientific theories and conduct investigations related to sustainable ecosystems; atomic and molecular structures and the properties of elements and compounds; the study of the universe and its properties and components; and the principles of electricity Course Code: SNC1P                          Course Title: Science                                   Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: None                                  Type: Applied This course enables students to develop their understanding of basic concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and to apply their knowledge of science to everyday situations. They are also given opportunities to develop practical skills related to scientific investigation. Students will plan and conduct investigations into practical problems and issues related to the impact of human activity on ecosystems; the structure and properties of elements and compounds; space exploration and the components of the universe; and static and current electricity GRADE 10 NON-CREDIT COURSES: Course Code: ICS2O              Course Title:  Introduction to Computer Studies      Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: None                     Type: Open This course introduces students to computer programming. Students will plan and write simple computer programs by applying fundamental programming concepts, and learn to create clear and maintainable internal documentation. They will also learn to manage a computer by studying hardware configurations, software selection, operating system functions, networking, and safe computing practices. Students will also investigate the social impact of computer technologies, and develop an understanding of environmental and ethical issues related to the use of computers. Course Code: MPM2D           Course Title: Principles of Mathematics                   Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: Grade 9 Mathematics, Academic                                                               Type: Academic This course enables students to broaden their understanding of relationships and extend their problem-solving and algebraic skills through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will explore quadratic relations and their applications; solve and apply linear systems; verify properties of geometric figures using analytic geometry; and investigate the trigonometry of right and acute triangles. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. Course Code: SNC2D                         Course Title: Science (Academic)                 Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: Grade 9 Science, Academic or Applied                                                   Type: Academic This course enables students to enhance their understanding of concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and of the interrelationships between science, technology, society, and the environment. Students are also given opportunities to further develop their scientific investigation skills. Students will plan and conduct investigations and develop their understanding of scientific theories related to the connections between cells and systems in animals and plants; chemical reactions, with a particular focus on acid–base reactions; forces that affect climate and climate change; and the interaction of light and matter. GRADE 11NON-CREDIT COURSES: Course Code: ICS3U              Course Title: Introduction to Computer Science       Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: None                     Type: University This course introduces students to computer science. Students will design software independently and as part of a team, using industry-standard programming tools and applying the software development life-cycle model. They will also write and use subprograms within computer programs. Students will develop creative solutions for various types of problems as their understanding of the computing environment grows. They will also explore environmental and ergonomic issues, emerging research in computer science, and global career trends in computer-related fields. Course Code: SCH3U                       Course Title: Chemistry                                  Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: Science, Grade 10, Academic                                                                  Type: University This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of the properties of chemicals and chemical bonds; chemical reactions and quantitative relationships in those reactions; solutions and solubility; and atmospheric chemistry and the behaviour of gases. Students will further develop their analytical skills and investigate the qualitative and quantitative properties of matter, as well as the impact of some common chemical reactions on society and the environment. Course Code: MCR3U                       Course Title: Functions                                 Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: Principles of Mathematics, Grade 10, Academic                                Type: University This course introduces the mathematical concept of the function by extending students’ experiences with linear and quadratic relations. Students will investigate properties of discrete and continuous functions, including trigonometric and exponential functions; represent functions numerically, algebraically, and graphically; solve problems involving applications of functions; investigate inverse functions; and develop facility in determining equivalent algebraic expressions. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems. GRADE 12 NON-CREDIT COURSES: Course Code: ICS4U                           Course Title: Computer Science                                      Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: Introduction to Computer Science, Grade 11, University Preparation               Type: University This course enables students to further develop knowledge and skills in computer science. Students will use modular design principles to create complex and fully documented programs, according to industry standards. Student teams will manage a large software development project, from planning through to project review. Students will also analyze algorithms for effectiveness. They will investigate ethical issues in computing and further explore environmental issues, emerging technologies, areas of research in computer science, and careers in the field. Course Code: SCH4U                          Course Title: Chemistry                               Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: Chemistry, Grade 11, University Preparation                                      Type: University This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of organic chemistry, the structure and properties of matter, energy changes and rates of reaction, equilibrium in chemical systems, and electrochemistry. Students will further develop their problem-solving and investigation skills as they investigate chemical processes, and will refine their ability to communicate scientific information. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of chemistry in everyday life and on evaluating the impact of chemical technology on the environment. Course Code: MCV4U                       Course Title: Calculus and Vectors                       Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: The new Advanced Functions course (MHF4U) must be taken prior to or concurrently with Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U).                     Type: University This course builds on students’ previous experience with functions and their developing understanding of rates of change. Students will solve problems involving geometric and algebraic representations of vectors and representations of lines and planes in three dimensional spaces; broaden their understanding of rates of change to include the derivatives of polynomial, sinusoidal, exponential, rational, and radical functions; and apply these concepts and skills to the modelling of real-world relationships. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended for students who choose to pursue careers in fields such as science, engineering, economics, and some areas of business, including those students who will be required to take a university-level calculus, linear algebra, or physics course. Course Code: MDM4U Course Title: Mathematics of Data Management               Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: Functions, Grade 11, University Preparation, or Functions and Applications, Grade 11, University/College Preparation Type: University This course broadens students’ understanding of mathematics as it relates to managing data. Students will apply methods for organizing and analyzing large amounts of information; solve problems involving probability and statistics; and carry out a culminating investigation that integrates statistical concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. Students planning to enter university programs in business, the social sciences, and the humanities will find this course of particular interest. Course Code: MHF4U                        Course Title: Advanced Functions                       Credit Value: 1 Pre-requisite: Functions, Grade 11, University Preparation, or Mathematics for College Technology, Grade 12, College Preparation                                    Type: University This course extends students’ experience with functions. Students will investigate the properties of polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; develop techniques for combining functions; broaden their understanding of rates of change; and develop facility in applying these concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended both for students taking the Calculus and Vectors course as a prerequisite for a university program and for those wishing to consolidate their understanding of mathematics before proceeding to any one of a variety of university programs.
All the course of study with short descriptions and detailed course outlined are available on the lighthouse academy website on the following links: Grade 9 credit courses: https://lighthouseacademy.ca/grade-9/ Grade 10 credit courses: https://lighthouseacademy.ca/grade-10/ Grade 11 credit courses: https://lighthouseacademy.ca/grade-11/ Grade 12 credit courses: https://lighthouseacademy.ca/grade-12/ Grade 9 non-credit courses: https://lighthouseacademy.ca/grade-9-courses/ Grade 10 non-credit courses: https://lighthouseacademy.ca/grade-10-courses/ Grade 11 non-credit courses: https://lighthouseacademy.ca/grade-11-courses/ Grade 12 non-credit courses: https://lighthouseacademy.ca/grade-12-courses/
All the courses offered at Lighthouse Academy Canada are developed as per the Ontario Ministry of Education guidelines. To access the Ontario Curriculum policy documents for secondary schools, please visit the following link: http://edu.gov.on.ca/eng/secondary.html
  • Cooperative Education:
Cooperative (co-op) educational programs allow the students to earn secondary school credits while completing a work placement in the community. The co-op programs complement students’ academic programs and are valuable for all students regardless of their post-secondary destination. Lighthouse Academy Canada does not offer cooperative education.
  • Job Shadowing:
Job shadowing allows the students to spend from half day up to three days observing a worker in a specific service. Lighthouse Academy Canada does not offer job shadowing for the grade 9-12 students as part of curriculum delivery.
All the grade 11 and 12 courses attempted by a student must be recorded on Ontario Student Transcript (OST) as per the policy of Ministry of Education. As per the full disclosure policy:
  • Withdrawal occurring within 5 days of the issuing of the first report card from Lighthouse Academy Canada will not be recorded on OST.
  • Withdrawal from a Grade 11 or 12 course after 5 days of the issuing of the first report card will result in a “W” being entered in the “Credit” column of the OST along with the mark at the time of the withdrawal.
  • Withdrawals from grade 9 & 10 will not be recorded on OST.
There are times when students may change their educational goals and may need to change the type of course. In grades 10-12, students may switch to a new course because they meet the prerequisites of the course. If the prerequisite is not met, students may take a summer, night, individual research project, or an e-learning course to achieve certain prerequisites. If the principal believes that a student can succeed in a new course without prerequisites, the principal may waive the prerequisite. A student wishing to change course types between Grades 10 and 11 and/or Grades 11 and 12 may, for example:
  • take a transfer course that will bridge the gap between course types;
  • take a course of another type (e.g., academic) that will satisfy the prerequisites for a course in a higher grade (e.g., a university preparation course) that the student wishes to take;
  • Take a summer course or undertake independent study to achieve the uncompleted expectations that are required to enter the new program.
Prime Learning Assessment and Recognition (PALR) is a formal assessment and recognition process where students enrolled in public, private or private education centers can evaluate their skills and knowledge against provincial curriculum policy documents to earn credit for their secondary school diploma. The PALR method includes challenging material, where students’ prior study meets the expectations of the provincial curriculum and is assessed with the objective of determining the equivalent material, where certificates of other jurisdictions are evaluated. The PLAR process is conducted under the direction of the Principal, who grants the credit.
All students may take alternative ways to complete courses through the Independent Learning Center, e-learning, continuing education, private study, etc. E-Learning E-learning is where courses are offered online to students in grades 9-12. E-learning involves the use of digital resources in virtual classroomsettings, where e-learning is the distance between teachers and students. For courses offered online, curriculum expectations for the course are addressed. Continuing Education Continuing education is taught outside the regular school program and in the summer months.  Private Study Students may be allowed to take one or more courses through private study if there is a valid reason for not attending the class or if the school course is not offered. The school must monitor student progress and evaluate student work.
The Assessment and Evaluation Policies are consistent with Ministry policy and reflects our vision that the primary purpose of assessment is to improve student learning. To ensure that examinations and evaluations are valid and reliable and that they lead to the improvement of student learning, teachers must use assessment and evaluation techniques, those are:
  • Address both what students learn and how well they learn;
  • Are based both on the categories of knowledge and skills and on the achievement level descriptions given in the achievement chart that appears in the curriculum policy document for each discipline;
  • Are varied in nature, administered over a period, and designed to provide opportunities for students to demonstrate the full range of their learning;
  • Are appropriate for the learning activities used, the purposes of instruction, and the needs and experiences of the students;
  • Are fair to all students;
  • Accommodate the needs of exceptional students, consistent with the strategies outlined in their individual education plan (IEP);
  • Accommodate the needs of students who are learning the language of instruction;
  • Ensure that each student is given clear directions for improvement;
  • Promote students’ ability to assess their own learning and to set specific goals;
  • Include the use of samples of students’ work that provide evidence of their achievement and
  • Are communicated clearly to students and parents at the beginning of the course and at other appropriate points throughout the course.
The Lighthouse Academy adheres to the assessment and evaluation practices described in the Ministry of Education’s growing success document. The final mark of each course will be divided into two parts: Final Examination (30%)
  • Each course has a final assessment that will be given as a final examination, a final project, or a combination of both an exam and a project.
  • Students in the same course should be similarly evaluated, which means that final exams assessments will use the same format although particular questions may be different among the students.
  • A course with a final examination must be written in a supervised environment with a proctor. A proctored exam is one that is overseen by an impartial individual, the Proctor, who monitors and supervises a student while he or she is taking the final exam. The Proctor enters the private password to allow student access to the final exam. The Proctor ensures the security and integrity of the exam process. Students in online courses with final exams, must fulfill their responsibilities in arranging and taking a proctored final exam.
Coursework (70%)
  • Students must complete all of the assigned coursework.
  • Coursework may include assignments, tests, projects, labs, discussions, etc.
  • Students assume the responsibility to ensure that they have completed all of the assigned requirements of the course before completing the final exam or assessment task.
  • Once the final exam is written or the final assessment is submitted, no further assignments may be submitted, unless prior arrangements have been made between the student and the teacher. Students will receive zeros for any incomplete assignments.
Students’ achievements must be officially reported to students and their parents via a report card. The report card focuses on two distinct but related aspects of student achievement: achieving curriculum expectations and developing learning skills. The report card will have separate sections for reporting in these two cases. The report card provides the following skills demonstrated by the student in each course in the following categories:
  • Works Independently
  • Teamwork
  • Organization
  • Work Habits
  • Initiative
Learning skills are assessed using a four-point scale (E – Excellent, G – Good, S – Satisfaction, N – Improvement needed). Individual assessment and reporting of teaching skills in these five areas reflects their critical role in achieving students ’curriculum expectations. Assessing the efficiency of teaching should not be considered in determining the grade of percentage. Ontario Student Record (OSR) The Ontario Student Record (OSR) is the record of a student’s educational progress through schools in Ontario. The Education Act requires that the principal of a school collect information “for inclusion in a record in respect of each pupil enrolled in the school and to establish, maintain, retain, transfer and dispose of the record”. The act also regulates access to an OSR: the OSR is “privileged for the information and use of supervisory officers and the principal and teachers of the school for the improvement of instruction” of the student. Each student and the parent(s) of a student who is not an adult (i.e., a student who is under the age of 18) must be made aware of the purpose and content of, and have access to, all the information in the OSR. An OSR will consist of the following components:
  • An OSR folder
  • Report cards
  • An Ontario Student Transcript
  • A documentation file
  • An office index card
  • Additional information identified as being conducive to the improvement of the Instruction of the student.
The principal is responsible for use and maintenance of the OSR and for assigning tasks related to that function to appropriate staff. The organization of OSR contents outlined below is intended to be from the front to the back of the OSR:
  • Most recent OST
  • Report cards (organized chronologically with the most recent at the front)
  • Any other documentation
Ontario Students Transcripts (OST) The Ontario Student Transcript is the official record of courses successfully completed and  credits gained toward the Ontario Secondary School Diploma. Information is updated annually and is part of the Ontario Student Record (OSR).
Post-secondary pathways Completing high school is one of the first great successes in life, but it’s important to realize that this, too, is just another step towards reaching your full potential. As graduation approaches, high schools are facing a crucial decision: What do I want to do next? Choosing a specific field of study – and thinking that it will one day lead to a fulfilling career – is an important step in shaping the future. In this series, we will focus on the different paths interested in exploring through post-secondary study. Each installment will focus on a specific area (e.g. science, business, math) and which courses should be taken throughout your high school to meet the prerequisite requirements, which secondary programs and institutions are specially recognized in the field and will provide a general idea of ​​what kind of career you can choose once you have achieved the field credential.  Job Shadowing and Twinning Job shadowing allows for students to spend half a day, and up to three days, observing a worker in a specific occupation. Job twinning allows students to observe a cooperative education student at his/her placement for one-half to one day. Job shadowing or twinning to the students in Grades 9-12 are not the part of curriculum delivery.
Each student will have the support of an academic counselor to help find the right course path to be successful in their secondary education. Our academic counsellors will guide students in selecting the appropriate courses to assist students in career planning, post-secondary education and apprenticeships. To ensure students are on track to complete OSSD requirements, the counselor will meet with student at various points of the school year to discuss academic progress. The academic counselor is responsible for coordinating course offerings and is the first point of contact available for students to consult with regarding course options and selections. Using the Ministry policy and guidelines outlined in “Creating Pathways to Success”, our counsellors are well experienced to helps students gain the knowledge and skills needed make informed post- secondary and career decisions. Lighthouse Academy Canada has academic counsellors, as well as individual support monitor teachers to help students achieve their learning goals. Students at risk will have meetings at various points of the course progress with the administration. Teachers will provide individual support, varied instructions, and differentiated assessment opportunities for students to demonstrate their learning goals and meet learning expectations of courses student is at risk with. Accommodations may be provided to special needs students given student has needs outlined in an IEP. A monitor resource teacher may be provided to help student develop organizational tools, skills and create a learning plan for students to follow during the course.
Lighthouse Academy Canada has a support framework to ensure ELL learners receive the support and care needed to be successful in achieve secondary education goals. An ELL is identified as a student who is new to Canada and learning English, or who is born in Canada and first learning English in school. ELL learners are given the appropriate focused support to help gain English proficiency. Lighthouse Academy offers ESL program courses to learn, improve and gain proficiency in verbal and written English while completing other Ontario curriculum credit courses simultaneously. ELL learners who are enrolled in ESL programs else where and attending credit courses at Lighthouse academy are provided with individual language support during instruction. This can include general classroom accommodations (but not limited to):  a variety of instruction and assessment strategies, learning circles, model or demonstrations of required/expected written or oral responses, visuals during instruction and visuals for clarification and explanation. Assessment accommodations can include (but not limited to): reduced length, more time for written assignments, verbal cuing, verbal and visual clarifications.
Students are expected to bring their own device for their own learning. Students will be provided with access to a Learning Management System (LMS) at Lighthouse Academy Canada. Our LMS tool, will be used for the intended educational purposes only and any other use is prohibited. School administration will provide students with password and LMS login information, which is expected to be protected by the student. Any inappropriate behavior, plagiarizing or illegal actions will be subject to consequences outlined by the administration.
Lighthouse Academy will help students connect with the various community resources available such as the local public library and newcomer services. Our academic counsellors will help students discover the resources available to them to support their learning needs.
Students with IEPs are provided with supports catering to their special needs. To help students achieve the learning expectations of each course and demonstrate sufficient learning evidence, a monitor teacher will be assigned to help the student receive individual support. Based on the IEP, examples of accommodations include:  extra time for tests/assignments, scribing of answers, use of assistive technology, preferential seating, chunking of information, frequent breaks, extra time for processing information, oral and written instructions, use of visuals; prompts to return attention to task, choice of assessment tasks and etc. Student accommodations will be provided according to the prescribed accommodations listed in the IEP document.