Lighthouse Academy Canada | Online High School | OSSD Credit Courses

COURSE OUTLINE OF SCH3U

Course Development: Lighthouse Academy Canada
Department: Science
Teacher: Dr. A B M Shamsur Rahman, OCT
Course Development Date: Jan. 2020
Course Reviser: None
Course Revision Date: Not Applicable
Course Title: Chemistry, Grade 11, University Preparation
Course Code: SCH3U
Grade: 11
Course Type:  Academic
Credit Value: 1
Prerequisite: Science, Grade 10, Academic

Name of Ministry Curriculum Policy Document(s):

Course Description

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of the properties of chemicals and chemical bonds; chemical reactions and quantitative relationships in those reactions; solutions and solubility; and atmospheric chemistry and the behaviour of gases. Students will further develop their analytical skills and investigate the qualitative and quantitative properties of matter, as well as the impact of some common chemical reactions on society and the environment.

Overall Expectations

  1. Demonstrate scientific investigation skills (related to both inquiry and research) in the four areas of skills (initiating and planning, performing and recording, analysing and interpreting, and communicating).
  2. Identify and describe a variety of careers related to the fields of science under study, and identify scientists, including Canadians, who have made contributions to those fields.
  1. Analyse the properties of commonly used chemical substances and their effects on human health and the environment, and propose ways to lessen their impact;
  2. Investigate physical and chemical properties of elements and compounds, and use various methods to visually represent them;
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of periodic trends in the periodic table and how elements combine to form chemical bonds.
  1. Analyse chemical reactions used in a variety of applications, and assess their impact on society and the environment;
  2. Investigate different types of chemical reactions;
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the different types of chemical reactions.
  1. Analyse processes in the home, the workplace, and the environmental sector that use chemical quantities and calculations, and assess the importance of quantitative accuracy in industrial chemical processes;
  2. Investigate quantitative relationships in chemical reactions, and solve related problems;
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the mole concept and its significance to the quantitative analysis of chemical reactions.
  1. Analyse the origins and effects of water pollution, and a variety of economic, social, and environmental issues related to drinking water;
  2. Investigate qualitative and quantitative properties of solutions, and solve related problems;
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of qualitative and quantitative properties of solutions.
  1. Analyse the cumulative effects of human activities and technologies on air quality, and describe some Canadian initiatives to reduce air pollution, including ways to reduce their own carbon footprint;
  2. Investigate gas laws that explain the behaviour of gases, and solve related problems;
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the laws that explain the behaviour of gases.

Units: Titles and Hours

Unit

Titles and Descriptions

Hours

Unit 1

Matter, Chemical Trends, and Chemical Bonding

24

Unit 2

Chemical Reactions

20

Unit 3

Quantities in Chemical Reactions

23

Unit 4

Unit 5

Solutions and Solubility

Gases and Atmospheric Chemistry

23

18

Final Exam

2

Total

110

Learning Skills

The following learning skills will be taught and assessed throughout the course and will be shown on the report card. Students’ performance in these skill areas will not be included in the final numeric mark. It is important to remember, however, that the development and consistent practice of these skills will influence academic achievement. These skills include:

Work Habits

Initiative

Team Work

Independent Work

Organization

Teaching Strategies

Assessment and Evaluation Guidelines

Assessment and evaluation are based on the provincial expectations and levels of achievement outlined in the provincial curriculum document for each subject in secondary school. A wide range of assessment and evaluation opportunities allows students to demonstrate their learning in a variety of ways. This information provides the basis for reporting student grades on the Provincial Report Card. Achievement (reflected in a final mark) will be calculated using the following categories:

Knowledge/Understanding

Thinking/Inquiry

Application

Communication

30 %

20 %

25 %

25 %

The student’s grade for the term marks will be based on the most consistent achievement with emphasis on the most recent within each category.

Students will also receive descriptive feedback as part of the learning process which may not be assigned a mark.

Final Mark = 70% Term + 30% Final Evaluation

Achievement Level Chart

Grade Range (%)

Achievement Level

Description

80-100

Level 4

A very high to outstanding level of achievement. Achievement is above the provincial standard.

70-79

Level 3

A high level of achievement.  Achievement is at the provincial standard.

60-69

Level 2

A moderate level of achievement.  Achievement is below, but approaching the provincial standard.

70-79

Level 1

A passable level of achievement.  Achievement is below the provincial standard.

<50

Insufficient achievement, a credit will not be granted.

Considerations for Program Planning

In order to achieve the curriculum expectations, the program is planned to conduct a variety of activities considering the following but not limited to:

  • ­­­­­Provide effective instructional approaches and learning activities draw on students’ prior knowledge, capture their interest, and encourage meaningful practice both inside and outside the classroom.
  • Provide students with opportunities to learn in a variety of ways – individually, cooperatively, independently, with teacher direction, through hands-on experiences, and through examples followed by practice.
  • Provide activities and challenges that actively engage students in inquiries that honor the ideas and skills students bring to them, while further deepening their conceptual understandings and essential skills.
  • Provide students with opportunities to use of a variety of equipments and materials that helps deepen and extend their understanding of scientific concepts and further extends their development of scientific investigation skills.
  • Make sure to follow safe practices at all times and communicate safety expectations to students in accordance with school board and Ministry of Education policies and Ministry of Labour regulations.
  • Motivate students to examine the opinions and values of others, detect bias, look for implied meaning in their readings, and use the information gathered to form a personal opinion or stance.
  • Provides opportunities for students to engage in various oral activities in connection with expectations in all the strands, such as brainstorming to identify what they know about the new topic they are studying, discussing strategies for solving a problem, presenting and defending ideas or debating issues, and offering critiques of models and results produced by their peers.
  • Encourage students to use ICT to support and communicate their learning.
  • Motivate students to develop a variety of important capabilities, including the ability to identify issues, conduct research, carry out experiments, solve problems, present results, and work on projects both independently and as a team.
  • Provide students with opportunities to explore various careers related to the areas of science under study and to research the education and training required for these careers.

Accommodations

Accommodations will be based on meeting with parent, teachers, administration and external educational assessment report. The following three types of accommodations may be provided:

  • Instructional accommodations: such as changes in teaching strategies, including styles of presentation, methods of organization, or use of technology and multimedia.
  • Environmental accommodations: such as preferential seating or special lighting.
  • Assessment accommodations: such as allowing additional time to complete tests or assignments or permitting oral responses to test questions.

Other examples of modifications and aids, which may be used in this course, are:

  • Provide step-by-step instructions.
  • Help students create organizers for planning writing tasks.
  • Record key words on the board or overhead when students are expected to make their own notes.
  • Allow students to report verbally to a scribe (teacher/ student) who can help in note taking.
  • Permit students a range of options for reading and writing tasks.
  • Where an activity requires reading, provide it in advance.
  • Provide opportunities for enrichment.

Teaching/Learning Resources

Teaching/Learning Materials

Subject binder, stationary set, pen, pencils, eraser, sharpener, ruler, geometry set, lined/grid graph paper, blank paper, scientific calculator.

Additional Information

Behavior

Every student is expected to respect other students’ right to a safe and supportive learning environment. Students are expected to behave in a considerate and reasonable manner at all times. A “zero tolerance” policy with respect to bullying, threatening, harassment, abusive language, spam, disruptive behavior and lack of respect is in effect and misbehavior may result in your removal from the course.

Academic Integrity

Students are expected to submit original work. Students who seek to attain academic advantage or help someone else obtain such advantage through cheating will receive a grade of zero. Any assignments submitted that are not original will receive a mark of zero. Students who persist in submitting un-cited or improperly cited assignments may be suspended or withdrawn from the course